Why are Blacks Poor? The Jewish Interview!

Borrowed from the Internet:

INTERVIEWER: Why are blacks so behind economically?

JEWISH LEADER: The only aspect blacks understand is consumption. Black people don’t understand the importance of building wealth. The fundamental rule is to keep the money within your racial group. We build Jewish Business, Hire Jewish, Buy Jewish and Spend Jewish.

There is nothing wrong with that, but it is a basic rule that blacks cannot comprehend and follow.

“He kills his fellow blacks daily instead of wanting to see his fellow blacks do well”. 93% of blacks killed in America is by other blacks.

Their leaders steal from their people and send the money back to their colonial master from whom they borrow the same money from – at an interest!

Every successful black wants to spend their money in the country of his colonial masters! They go on holiday abroad, buy houses abroad, school abroad and hospitals abroad… instead of spending the money in their country to benefit their own people.

Statistics show that Jew’s money exchanges hands 18 times before leaving his community, while for blacks it is possibly a maximum of once or zero.

Only 6% of black money goes back to their community. This is why Jews are the top and blacks are at the bottom of every ladder in the society.

Instead of buying Louis Vuitton, Gucci, expensive cars, shoes, dresses, houses, etc. blacks can industrialize Africa, build Africa and get rid of colonial institutions by putting them out of business.

INTERVIEWER: What are your thoughts on failure of blacks economically?

JEWISH LEADER: Well, nothing is the Black Mans fault. His compulsive habit of killing his own, compulsive material consumption, his inability to build businesses or preserve wealth is usually somebody else’s fault!

INTERVIEWER: So what can Blacks do to liberate themselves?

JEWISH LEADER: Blacks must take responsibility. They must unit and vehemently fight corrupt leaders who run down their country! They must run to IMF borrow to build their country as though IMF was father Christmas!

www.chombachuma.com

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Opinion:You Lazy (Intellectual) African Scum!

They call the Third World the lazy man’s purview; the sluggishly slothful and languorous prefecture. In this realm people are sleepy, dreamy, torpid, lethargic, and therefore indigent—totally penniless, needy, destitute, poverty-stricken, disfavored, and impoverished. In this demesne, as they call it, there are hardly any discoveries, inventions, and innovations. Africa is the trailblazer. Some still call it “the dark continent” for the light that flickers under the tunnel is not that of hope, but an approaching train. And because countless keep waiting in the way of the train, millions die and many more remain decapitated by the day.

“It’s amazing how you all sit there and watch yourselves die,” the man next to me said. “Get up and do something about it.”

Brawny, fully bald-headed, with intense, steely eyes, he was as cold as they come. When I first discovered I was going to spend my New Year’s Eve next to him on a non-stop JetBlue flight from Los Angeles to Boston I was angst-ridden. I associate marble-shaven Caucasians with iconoclastic skin-heads, most of who are racist.

“My name is Walter,” he extended his hand as soon as I settled in my seat.

I told him mine with a precautious smile.

“Where are you from?” he asked.

“Zambia.”

“Zambia!” he exclaimed, “Kaunda’s country.”

“Yes,” I said, “Now Sata’s.”

“But of course,” he responded. “You just elected King Cobra as your president.”

My face lit up at the mention of Sata’s moniker. Walter smiled, and in those cold eyes I saw an amenable fellow, one of those American highbrows who shuttle between Africa and the U.S.

“I spent three years in Zambia in the 1980s,” he continued. “I wined and dined with Luke Mwananshiku, Willa Mungomba, Dr. Siteke Mwale, and many other highly intelligent Zambians.” He lowered his voice. “I was part of the IMF group that came to rip you guys off.” He smirked. “Your government put me in a million dollar mansion overlooking a shanty called Kalingalinga. From my patio I saw it all—the rich and the poor, the ailing, the dead, and the healthy.”

“Are you still with the IMF?” I asked.

“I have since moved to yet another group with similar intentions. In the next few months my colleagues and I will be in Lusaka to hypnotize the cobra. I work for the broker that has acquired a chunk of your debt. Your government owes not the World Bank, but us millions of dollars. We’ll be in Lusaka to offer your president a couple of millions and fly back with a check twenty times greater.”

“No, you won’t,” I said. “King Cobra is incorruptible. He is …”

He was laughing. “Says who? Give me an African president, just one, who has not fallen for the carrot and stick.”

Quett Masire’s name popped up.

“Oh, him, well, we never got to him because he turned down the IMF and the World Bank. It was perhaps the smartest thing for him to do.”

At midnight we were airborne. The captain wished us a happy 2012 and urged us to watch the fireworks across Los Angeles.

“Isn’t that beautiful,” Walter said looking down.

From my middle seat, I took a glance and nodded admirably.

“That’s white man’s country,” he said. “We came here on Mayflower and turned Indian land into a paradise and now the most powerful nation on earth. We discovered the bulb, and built this aircraft to fly us to pleasure resorts like Lake Zambia.”

I grinned. “There is no Lake Zambia.”

He curled his lips into a smug smile. “That’s what we call your country. You guys are as stagnant as the water in the lake. We come in with our large boats and fish your minerals and your wildlife and leave morsels—crumbs. That’s your staple food, crumbs. That corn-meal you eat, that’s crumbs, the small Tilapia fish you call Kapenta is crumbs. We the Bwanas (whites) take the cat fish. I am the Bwana and you are the Muntu. I get what I want and you get what you deserve, crumbs. That’s what lazy people get—Zambians, Africans, the entire Third World.”

The smile vanished from my face.

“I see you are getting pissed off,” Walter said and lowered his voice. “You are thinking this Bwana is a racist. That’s how most Zambians respond when I tell them the truth. They go ballistic. Okay. Let’s for a moment put our skin pigmentations, this black and white crap, aside. Tell me, my friend, what is the difference between you and me?”

“There’s no difference.”

“Absolutely none,” he exclaimed. “Scientists in the Human Genome Project have proved that. It took them thirteen years to determine the complete sequence of the three billion DNA subunits. After they

were all done it was clear that 99.9% nucleotide bases were exactly the same in you and me. We are the same people. All white, Asian, Latino, and black people on this aircraft are the same.”

I gladly nodded.

“And yet I feel superior,” he smiled fatalistically. “Every white person on this plane feels superior to a black person. The white guy who picks up garbage, the homeless white trash on drugs, feels superior to you no matter his status or education. I can pick up a nincompoop from the New York streets, clean him up, and take him to Lusaka and you all be crowding around him chanting muzungu, muzungu and yet he’s a riffraff. Tell me why my angry friend.”

For a moment I was wordless.

“Please don’t blame it on slavery like the African Americans do, or colonialism, or some psychological impact or some kind of stigmatization. And don’t give me the brainwash poppycock. Give me a better answer.”

I was thinking.

He continued. “Excuse what I am about to say. Please do not take offense.”

I felt a slap of blood rush to my head and prepared for the worst.

“You my friend flying with me and all your kind are lazy,” he said. “When you rest your head on the pillow you don’t dream big. You and other so-called African intellectuals are damn lazy, each one of you. It is you, and not those poor starving people, who is the reason Africa is in such a deplorable state.”

“That’s not a nice thing to say,” I protested.

He was implacable. “Oh yes it is and I will say it again, you are lazy. Poor and uneducated Africans are the most hardworking people on earth. I saw them in the Lusaka markets and on the street selling merchandise. I saw them in villages toiling away. I saw women on Kafue Road crushing stones for sell and I wept. I said to myself where are the Zambian intellectuals? Are the Zambian engineers so imperceptive they cannot invent a simple stone crusher, or a simple water filter to purify well water for those poor villagers? Are you telling me that after thirty-seven years of independence your university school of engineering has not produced a scientist or an engineer who can make simple small machines for mass use? What is the school there for?”

I held my breath.

“Do you know where I found your intellectuals? They were in bars quaffing. They were at the Lusaka Golf Club, Lusaka Central Club, Lusaka Playhouse, and Lusaka Flying Club. I saw with my own eyes a bunch of alcoholic graduates. Zambian intellectuals work from eight to five and spend the evening drinking. We don’t. We reserve the evening for brainstorming.”

He looked me in the eye.

“And you flying to Boston and all of you Zambians in the Diaspora are just as lazy and apathetic to your country. You don’t care about your country and yet your very own parents, brothers and sisters are in Mtendere, Chawama, and in villages, all of them living in squalor. Many have died or are dying of neglect by you. They are dying of AIDS because you cannot come up with your own cure. You are here calling yourselves graduates, researchers and scientists and are fast at articulating your credentials once asked—oh, I have a PhD in this and that—PhD my foot!”

I was deflated.

“Wake up you all!” he exclaimed, attracting the attention of nearby passengers. “You should be busy lifting ideas, formulae, recipes, and diagrams from American manufacturing factories and sending them to your own factories. All those research findings and dissertation papers you compile should be your country’s treasure. Why do you think the Asians are a force to reckon with? They stole our ideas and turned them into their own. Look at Japan, China, India, just look at them.”

He paused. “The Bwana has spoken,” he said and grinned. “As long as you are dependent on my plane, I shall feel superior and you my friend shall remain inferior, how about that? The Chinese, Japanese, Indians, even Latinos are a notch better. You Africans are at the bottom of the totem pole.”

He tempered his voice. “Get over this white skin syndrome and begin to feel confident. Become innovative and make your own stuff for god’s sake.”

At 8 a.m. the plane touched down at Boston’s Logan International Airport. Walter reached for my hand.

“I know I was too strong, but I don’t give it a damn. I have been to Zambia and have seen too much poverty.” He pulled out a piece of paper and scribbled something. “Here, read this. It was written by a friend.”

He had written only the title: “Lords of Poverty.”

Thunderstruck, I had a sinking feeling. I watched Walter walk through the airport doors to a waiting car. He had left a huge dust devil twirling in my mind, stirring up sad memories of home. I could see Zambia’s literati—the cognoscente, intelligentsia, academics, highbrows, and scholars in the places he had mentioned guzzling and talking irrelevancies. I remembered some who have since passed—how they got the highest grades in mathematics and the sciences and attained the highest education on the planet. They had been to Harvard, Oxford, Yale, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), only to leave us with not a single invention or discovery. I knew some by name and drunk with them at the Lusaka Playhouse and Central Sports.

Walter is right. It is true that since independence we have failed to nurture creativity and collective orientations. We as a nation lack a workhorse mentality and behave like 13 million civil servants dependent on a government pay cheque. We believe that development is generated 8-to-5 behind a desk wearing a tie with our degrees hanging on the wall. Such a working environment does not offer the opportunity for fellowship, the excitement of competition, and the spectacle of innovative rituals.

But the intelligentsia is not solely, or even mainly, to blame. The larger failure is due to political circumstances over which they have had little control. The past governments failed to create an environment of possibility that fosters camaraderie, rewards innovative ideas and encourages resilience. KK, Chiluba, Mwanawasa, and Banda embraced orthodox ideas and therefore failed to offer many opportunities for drawing outside the line.

I believe King Cobra’s reset has been cast in the same faculties as those of his predecessors. If today I told him that we can build our own car, he would throw me out.

“Naupena? Fuma apa.” (Are you mad? Get out of here)

Knowing well that King Cobra will not embody innovation at Walter’s level let’s begin to look for a technologically active-positive leader who can succeed him after a term or two. That way we can make our own stone crushers, water filters, water pumps, razor blades, and harvesters. Let’s dream big and make tractors, cars, and planes, or, like Walter said, forever remain inferior.

A fundamental transformation of our country from what is essentially non-innovative to a strategic superior African country requires a bold risk-taking educated leader with a triumphalist attitude and we have one in YOU. Don’t be highly strung and feel insulted by Walter. Take a moment and think about our country. Our journey from 1964 has been marked by tears. It has been an emotionally overwhelming experience. Each one of us has lost a loved one to poverty, hunger, and disease. The number of graves is catching up with the population. It’s time to change our political culture. It’s time for Zambian intellectuals to cultivate an active-positive progressive movement that will change our lives forever. Don’t be afraid or dispirited, rise to the challenge and salvage the remaining few of your beloved ones.

 

This article was penned by Field Ruwe.  He is a US-based Zambian media practitioner and author. He is a PhD candidate with a B.A. in Mass Communication and Journalism, and an M.A. in History. !

UNCEA Report – Kenya highest in Poverty Rise over 2 decades!

Even though Africa has made progress towards achieving MDG (Millennium Development Goals), some countries have actually seen a rise in Poverty Levels. Kenya had the highest rise in Poverty Levels in Sub-Sahara Africa in the 2 decades (1990-2010)  with a rise of 28.4%!

This report may have escaped your radar, but would like to bring it to your attention to realise how dire the situation is!

Poverty_reduction_30_African_countries_Viwanda

Based on 30 African countries for which at least two data points were available, collective poverty reduction efforts resulted in an 8.7 per cent drop in poverty over a period of eight years. The greatest reduction was in the Gambia,
which achieved a 32 per cent reduction, followed by Burkina Faso, the Niger, Swaziland, Ethiopia, Uganda and Malawi. Poverty declined by varying degrees in 24 out of the 30 countries analysed, from 0.1 per cent in Egypt to 32 per cent in the Gambia. However, poverty rates also increased in 6 of the same 30 countries, from an average of 0.4 per cent in the Central African Republic to 28.4 per cent in Kenya, which represent the lowest and highest increases over the same period. Increases in poverty were also notable in Mauritania, Nigeria and Zambia, whereas Madagascar, Sierra Leone and Tunisia registered significant poverty reduction over a period of eight years.

Kenya – I believe there is hope

It has been 52 years since independence and Kenya has come of age.

5 years ago, we voted for a new constitution. This was a momentous decree that came as hope for millions of Kenyans, young and old. It came as a fresh of breath air to end the long tyranny of dictatorship and authoritarian rule that Kenyans were accustomed to.

Despite this titanic change in our lives, Kenyans have not gained faith in their leaders. We are still crippled by manacles of corruption, venality and bribery. Kenyans are still languishing in poverty, desolate and numbed by our leaders’ greed and insatiable appetite for self-interest. It is a shameful condition where politics and business are so intertwined that the line between public office and interests to channel funds to one’s enterprise cannot be drawn. So insensitized that we poke fun at ourselves when the joke is really on us. The audacity of pricing a ‘biro’ at $85, when close to half of the population receives less than $1 a day in income for living expenses. The nerves and boldness to stay in public offices with such impunity since past regressions set precedence for future ‘convictions’. It is not just unacceptable, but immoral, wicked and iniquitous for any leadership, past or incumbent not to account for public funds, save their source of wealth and opulence.

Kenya has become the true embodiment of the Boiling Frog story. The premise that a frog placed in boiling water will jump out to save its life. However, the same frog placed in cold water that is slowly heated never perceives the danger and is cooked to death. We have become anaesthetized by the daily stories of corrupt leadership that thrives in impunity and lawlessness. The lack of accountability and poor governance has reached unprecedented levels, yet we seem least bothered with the plight of our future and generations to come.

I refuse to believe that this is the Kenya we want. I refuse to suppose that our moral fiber has completely degenerated. The common mwananchi is true to his/her morals, patriotic to their nation and with the correct leadership, I believe Kenya can be great again. All Kenyans want is a prosperous nation where all men and women are treated equal before the law and true governance, prosperity and social cohesion gives future generations hope and opportunity for greatness.

I need to remind Kenyans of the true urgency of now. To quote and adopt from Martin Luther King Jr, ‘There is no time to engage in the luxury of cooling off or take the tranquilizing drug of gradualism. Now is the time to rise from the dark and desolate valley of corruption to the sunlit path of good governance and prosperity.’

The uprisings we have seen in Arab countries and other nations of the world are not immune to Kenya. It comes a time when the youth and citizens of our country must stand to true principles and say ‘Enough is enough’. Resourceful protest and activism need not be violent, but a resolution and tenacity in each one of us that this is not what we bargained for from our leadership. This is not what we voted in the new constitution.

I believe Kenya can be great again. A dream that I believe will happen in our generation.

A time when Kenyan leaders will embody the spirit of ‘servant leadership’ and live to their true creed of “Civil Service”; that a visit to a public office will not just be a pleasant experience, but a true service without the need for ‘kitu-kidogo’.

A time when Leaders won’t have to spend millions to get into public office with the single intent of amassing wealth and draining public coffers; that election into public office will be based on ideologies, principles and philosophies well communicated to mwananchi to cast their vote.

A time when Mwangi and Mutisya, Kamau and Kajwang, Kerubo and Keitanny will be able to sit together in brotherhood and sisterhood to celebrate their diversity and culture; that each will embody their cultural differences as a strength and treasure for our great nation.

A time when Kenya’s entrepreneurial nature will be harnessed through formal, legitimate and innovative business philosophy for true economic prosperity of our nation; that this prosperity will make our lives better, offer employment, reduce poverty and give hope for generations to come.

I believe there is hope in Kenya.

Hope that the youth of our nation can make the changes we aspire and live to see them in our generation.

Hope that a new leadership in Kenya will emerge that has more interest in its people than plain egotistical, self-centered and arrogant control that we have seen in the past decades.

Hope that the youthful masses constituting more than 75% of the electorate will heed to wisdom of their conscience and lead at the front-line with their vote as the primary weapon of change.

Hope that Kenyans will see beyond short campaign outbursts of politicians seeking votes during elections and fighting tooth and nail to accomplish their family legacy of ‘aspirational’ leadership.

And when this happens, generations will be grateful for true service leadership of our nation. We will look back and put their ideals together with Dedan Kimathi, Robert Ouko, JM Kariuki, Koitalel Arap Samoei, Tom Mboya, Jomo Kenyatta and others who have left indelible mark of patriotism in our country.

I believe and hope that Kenya will be great again, one day!

Dr Chomba Chuma

Tumainilakenya.org

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Meeting Steve Wozniak – Apple co-founder

I am sometimes honored to meet interesting and amazing people. In this circumstance, I must have met one of my business idols and undoubtedly the brains behind Apple – Steve Wozniak!. His insights into business and technology are amazing.

If you doubt how amazing his legacy is, let’s look at the numbers first.

Apple Inc. is currently (and the last 2 years[i]) the most valuable company in the world by market capitalization; commanding more than $413b. This is more than Exxon Mobil, Petro China, Wal-Mart and other huge multinationals in various sectors.

Steve Wozniak happens to have been there right at the start of Apple Inc.

Together with Steve Jobs and Ronald Wayne, they started the company in 1976 with the sole goal of selling Apple I personal computer kit, a computer single-handedly designed by Steve Wozniak! [ii] Apple went to incorporate on 3rd January, 1977 without Ronald Wayne who sold his share of the company to Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak.

There was incredible growth in the company initially with revenue doubling every four months within the first five years of operation.

Steve Wozniak gave incredible insights into how it all started and was amazed by how humbly he has remained despite the contribution and drive he has put in a company that has revolutionalised the world!.

A number of take away messages after meeting Steve Wozniak:steve-wozniac-apple inc

  1. Technology is all around us – We just have to keep an open mind, curious eye and a yearning to learn.
  2. You need a team behind every success – No one can do it alone. The combination of Steve Wozniak and Steve Jobs undoubtedly produced what Apple is today.
  3. Passion is a key ingredient of Success – With passion for what you are doing, it becomes easy to go through the challenges and tribulations of business and personal lives.

 


[i] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_public_corporations_by_market_capitalization

[ii] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apple_Inc.

MD of Vitabiotics and chair of KEDASA

 By KC Rottok | wednesday, 07 march 2012 16:02

 

“Given the challenges you face as an entrepreneur, I think it is equally important to sharpen your emotional IQ as you would with business expertise!”

 

I was first introduced to the name Dr. Chomba Chuma when it appeared in my inbox in 2007 inviting me to a presentation on South African property. A few days later I joined a small group that had come to listen to the owner of Mumbi Properties explain how to use trusts to create a property portfolio.

 

“I named the company Mumbi after my late sister,” he informed me when we met recently.

“I got the idea of forming the company when I had acquired my fourth property in the country and needed a vehicle to manage them. I figured that as my portfolio grew so would the company. Unfortunately we hit a rough patch when the recession hit in 2008 but things are slowly getting back on track.”

 Chomba was drawn to property investment because it allowed him to develop the passive income the industry promised by way of rentals and capital growth. The bulk of his time is taken up by his position as the Managing Director of Vitabiotics South Africa, a company he co-owns following a decision to venture into the business world after a career as a medical doctor.

 

“I ended up as a doctor due to the Kenyan education system,” he explained with a slight frown. “When I got good grades the system kind of dictated that I pursue either pharmacy or medicine. I pursued the latter at Moi University and on completion of my studies and internship I joined the Swiss pharmaceutical giant Roche. Six months later they posted me to Johannesburg as the medical director for Sub Saharan Africa.”

 

Chuma believes that moving with his wife Rispah whom he met in medical school made the transition less difficult. He worked for two years at the company before joining Sanofi Aventis as a national sales manager for a blood thinner. While at Sanofi, he established his own company called Lighthouse Pharma selling supplements through Dischem and independent courier pharmacies.

 

“In 2006, after a year at Sanofi, I felt that my company was doing well enough for me to take a leap of faith and run it on a full time basis,” he recalled, this time with a smile. “We were able to get more products into the Dischem chain of pharmacies and in 2008 we decided to make our company bigger by selling a majority stake to our suppliers Vitabiotics UK.”

 

When asked whether the move to full time business was easy, his frown returned as he explained with an air of seriousness what the trying times have taught him.

“I think one should go to a school of psychology rather than a business college when contemplating becoming an entrepreneur,” he advised. “I did a business diploma and later pursued an MBA which I thought would equip me for the challenges ahead. Well, that doesn’t prepare you mentally to be tough when sales are slow and you have to pay salaries.”

 

The biggest challenge that Vitabiotics faced was that of distribution. Chomba revealed that to get a product like Immunace to a place like Upington by courier costs more than the product itself. Hence it was a big break for the company when their products were approved for distribution through Clicks which has about 400 stores and 280 pharmacies nationally.

“That was a new beginning for us,” he beamed.

 

And speaking of new beginnings, I asked Chomba about a new association he has been at the forefront of founding known as the Kenyan Diaspora Association of South Africa (KEDASA).

“We had a meeting in May to form the association as an umbrella body for the many different Kenyan groups that exist in South Africa. The inaugural office bearers are drawn from these groups and so far we have presented our views to President Mwai Kibaki in Pretoria, hosted the Commission for the Implementation of the Constitution (CIC) and I represented the association at the meeting of Kenyan Ambassadors held in Mombasa.”

 

At the time of the interview, the association was also working on a plan to mobilise assistance for Kenyans who have been affected by the ongoing drought in East Africa.

 

“The association has a draft constitution largely borrowed from a similar association for Kenyans in Holland,” Chomba explained continued. “It will guide the membership and leadership structure as well as establish a continuous process for raising funds to make it self-sufficient. It is important that the organisation unlike the many that came before it outlives its interim office bearers.”

 

Conscious of the many organisations that have previously represented Kenyans in SA, I ask Chomba what makes KEDASA different.

“Being an umbrella body means that we essentially have corporate members including a number of churches, Prokey, KESABA, student bodies, KEFA and the Upendo Women’s Investments Group. Our approach is different seeing as we are not competing with these organisations but rather inviting them to participate in a collaborative effort. If you consider the success of the CIC meeting, belonging to an umbrella body facilitates communication as the different bodies bring in their members for each project.”

 

Chomba is a 36 year old father of two; daughter Lerato and son Tsepo. His plan is to establish a few companies in SA over the next decade that can run themselves without his involvement then return to Kenya to participate in national development.

 Article available online – http://www.expatriate.co.za/index.php/articles/38-profiles/124-kc-rottok.html

 

Vitamin Boost – Entrepreneur

BY XOLILE BHENGU, APRIL 02 2012, 10:56

Vitabiotics SA MD Chomba Chuma doesn’t regret switching careers from medical doctor to businessman. While working for a multinational pharmaceutical company, the Kenya-born doctor saw an opportunity in the SA market to start a company supplying complementary medicines.

“I started up with my own capital, buying Vitabiotics products from the UK and selling them in SA.” Chuma then formed a joint venture with Vitabiotics UK with capitalization of £100,000.

“It was simple but not easy. I made a solid case for SA and Africa as a market but the perceptions about Africa always weigh down on business decisions. However, after the first year and with excellent results it became easier,” he says. “Complementary medicines are huge in Kenya and Nigeria, where the market covers a wider group of products including herbs, homeopathy and traditional preparations.

However, Vitabiotics is in the vitamin & mineral supplements market, which is more scientifically refined.” He hopes the industry will eventually be regulated in the way that scheduled medicines are. Vitabiotics UK owns 80% of the SA business, which employs 13 staff and distributes more than 50 products through Clicks.

Chuma expects turnover of R15m for 2010 and is aiming for a bigger slice of the estimated R3bn market. “People usually base their affinity on either their knowledge of the company or the product; we want to see if we can combine the two.”

This article can be accessed from http://www.financialmail.co.za/fm/2010/11/11/entrepreneur—chomba-chuma

CHOMBA_CHUMA_Financial_Mail_Nov_201023.pdf

Building Wealth in Property

18-NOV-2008 | Maryanne Maina

MUMBI Properties helps clients protect their assets in trust structures, which enable them to accumulate an infinite property portfolio and eventually wealth in property.

 Seven teams of experts are brought in to set up the right structures for wealth protection and specifically to build a healthy property portfolio.

“The teams we use include: trust attorneys, trust accountants, risk managers, portfolio managers, real estate agents, property finance mortgage originators and rental management,” said Dr Chomba Chuma.

Chuma further explained his role at the organisation and how he landed in this industry.

“I am managing director of MUMBI-Wealth Evolution! and responsible for the overall strategic and operational running of the company. My work involves looking into the future, making decisions on our strategic alliances and planning ahead how the organisation should run. This involves planning, forecasting and providing overall direction for the group.

“I am also involved in the general coordination of the operational relationship of all the seven different divisions. I ensure that they talk to each other and work harmoniously to provide good service to all our customers within the company’s client base.”

Chuma is a medical doctor by profession, but real estate has always been his passion.

He graduated with a medical degree in 2000. After joining the pharmaceutical industry, he did a management diploma with Unisa from 2003 to 2004.

“Thereafter I joined Mancosa where I did my MBA with an elective in portfolio management. I am also a certified estate agent with the Estate Agency Affairs Board that oversees all the estate agency affairs in South Africa,” he said.

“After completing my internship and practising for a year, I was employed by a multinational pharmaceutical company as a medical adviser for sub-Saharan Africa.

“Immediately after, I started looking for property investments and bought the first few properties under my name. After two years, we started a mortgage origination company, Mortgage Africa, targeted at foreign nationals living in South Africa since we could arrange 100percent bonds on properties bought.

“This was my entry point into real estate. We arranged property finance for a large number of foreign nationals with work permits and purchased property.

“However, after a few years we realised that there was a need to provide properties to our client base as well. There was a need to have a fully fledged real estate agency to do this and we consequently registered MUMBI Properties for this purpose,” he said.

“I learnt about the use of trust structures, which could offer protection to my investments and assist me to get an infinite property portfolio. This bore the idea of MUMBI-Wealth Evolution!, which advocates the use of right structures, right experts and right properties to acquire an infinite property portfolio,” he said.

The company has more than 1500 clients and Chuma envisions enlarging this database in the future to include more people who are passionate about property as a way of creating and protecting wealth.

“My inspiration to succeed is driven by two things. Firstly, is to offer value to my clients and ensure that they succeed with their property investments. There is nothing more satisfying than a happy client who sings your praise (or the company’s praise) for a job well done.

“In addition, our clients are with us for the long haul. We both have an understanding that we shall manage their investments for a very long time, probably a lifetime. Secondly, the wealth and financial freedom that one gets from property investment is a major inspiration.”

It is crucial to have strong organisational skills to keep all the operations of the business running smoothly. A good command of financial skills is also important to keep an eye on the figures.

Most importantly though, is the passion for the work, a desire to succeed and motivation to keep going even in tough times.

Article available online – http://www.sowetanlive.co.za/sowetan/archive/2008/11/18/building-wealth-in-property